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Imputing Income for Support

Imputing Income for Support

Imputing Income for Support

January 4, 2024

By Johnson/Turner Legal

Imputing Income for Support

January 4, 2024

By Johnson/Turner Legal

Adjusting Finances Post-Divorce: Understanding Child Support and Imputed Income

Financial Rearrangements After Divorce or Custody Actions

After a divorce or custody action, it’s common for both parties to reevaluate and restructure their finances. When children are involved, both parents bear the responsibility of providing financial support. Situations such as job loss, career changes, or unemployment can significantly impact this obligation. In such cases, a concept known as ‘imputing income’ becomes crucial in determining child support.

Imputing Income: What It Means in Child Support

Imputing income allows a court to assign a certain income level to a custodial parent, even if their actual earnings differ. Under Minnesota Statute §518A.32, courts examine a parent’s “potential income” to decide whether child support should reflect what the parent could potentially earn, rather than their current earnings. Factors considered include the parent’s recent work history, occupational qualifications, and the possibility of earning a minimum wage for at least 30 hours per week.

When Is Imputing Income Appropriate?

It’s essential to understand that imputing income isn’t automatically applied whenever a parent experiences a decrease in income. A parent won’t be deemed voluntarily underemployed in cases like physical or mental incapacities that limit their ability to work full-time. Moreover, if a parent has undergone a legitimate career change, the court will balance the impact of the income reduction against the benefits of the new employment.

Seeking Expert Guidance on Child Support and Imputed Income

Navigating child support and imputed income can be complex. If you have questions about your child support order or how these laws apply to your situation, our team is ready to assist. Contact us at (320) 299-4249 to discuss your case and explore your options regarding child support adjustments.

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